Meiji Jingu Shrine

Look at most popular  Shirin, Meiji Jingu (明治神宮). Meiji Jingu Shrine is devoted to the heavenly souls of Emperor Meiji and his consort Empress Shoken.

Meiji Emperor passed away in 1912 and Empress Shoken in 1914. After their end, people wished to honor their ideals and to love them until the end of time. So they gave 100,000 trees from all over Japan and from abroad, and they worked intentionally to make this timberland. In this way, on account of the true heart of the general population, this place of worship was built up on November 1, 1920.

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History

Meiji Jingu, a holy place of national request to God for peace and success was worked as an aftereffect of combinated his ideals. The holy place building was lost by flame amid the last war, yet was reproduced in 1958, being bolstered by all unwavering Japanese. The sentiments of respect and longing of the general population for the Empreor and Empress are perpetually expanding.

Cherished Emperor and Empress in Meiji Jingu

Meiji Emperor (1852 – 1912) is the 122nd ruler of Japan, the immense granddad of the present Emperor. He rose to the throne in 1867. At the point when Japan was confronting phenomenal conditions, for example, the opening of the nation to the world after its long detachment and the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate, Emperor Meiji took the activity to advance companionship with different nations, and to present western human progress and created innovation from abroad while saving japanese character, and in this manner established the frameworks of current Japan.

Emperor Shoken (1850 – 1914 upheld the Emperor in the background as well as dedicated herself to advancing national welfare and ladies’ instruction. She was additionally worried about world undertakings, and she gave an asset, named after her, to the International Red Cross, which has been utilized for worldwide welfare exercises until today.

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Access:
use JR Yamanote Line to Harajuku then walk

map:

Lonely Planet Japan

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